Easter 2018

Trench 23 is ready for the summer As a precursor to the summer season a few of us usually arrive in Sedgeford in March/April to fieldwalk. Notwithstanding as there is a backlog of finds from previous fieldwalking it has been decided to devote the time to analysing and cataloguing these items. Although good progress has been made there will still be some work to do in order for us to completely catch up. On Monday, due to favourable weather, some of us had a walk around the village with Dr. John giving us a running commentary on the medieval history of the area. We visited the church and were fascinated with the medieval graffiti etched into the stonework. comprising of concentric circles, a

A bit about BERT

SHARP's Basic Excavation and Recording Techniques - or BERT - course is our introduction to archaeology for all comers. Run by two experienced archaeologists, Deborah and Phil, BERT is a doorway into a fascinating world where the ancient meets the modern, science meets humanities, and everyone meets a lot of dirt. Deborah started out in archaeology on a BERT course - seventeen years later, and after a successful career in archaeology, she is still passionate about it. "I think archaeology is the best job/interest/hobby in the world, it makes me so happy and I want to share that with everyone and anyone," she says. Ready for the first BERT cohort: Trench 23, Week 1 2017 The majority of time o

Sedgeford’s Anglo-Saxon Malthouse

It has taken five years and it has been hard work, but we are now confident that in Trench 23 we are excavating the only known Anglo-Saxon malthouse. The corpus of Mid Anglo-Saxon grain-dryers is growing, and one or two of these have been identified as malting kilns from the carbonised remains of germinated grain found in and around them. But the dryers – or kilns or ovens or whatever we choose to call them – usually sit in splendid isolation, with little or no evidence for associated structures and features. They represent heavy investment in industrial-scale plant, but we cannot see the rest of the infrastructure, so we can’t reconstruct the whole process involved. Dryers were probably mul

Sedgeford’s Anglo-Saxon Malthouse

It has taken five years and it has been hard work, but we are now confident that in Trench 23 we are excavating the only known Anglo-Saxon malthouse. The corpus of Mid Anglo-Saxon grain-dryers is growing, and one or two of these have been identified as malting kilns from the carbonised remains of germinated grain found in and around them. But the dryers – or kilns or ovens or whatever we choose to call them – usually sit in splendid isolation, with little or no evidence for associated structures and features. They represent heavy investment in industrial-scale plant, but we cannot see the rest of the infrastructure, so we can’t reconstruct the whole process involved. Dryers were probably mul

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